2006-02-18 00:00:00

HIMSS 2006: Harmonization and interoperability getting more than lip service

Walking around the exhibits with my customers and fellow bloggers at HIMSS this year I found that harmonization and iteroperability were two themes that most vendors were touting. Ubiquity of networks (through wireless technologies) will allow excellent location-based awareness and medical devices will be more and more connected. Given the connected nature of hundreds, perhaps thousands of network-centric devices in our hospitals, we’ll need to make sure that data can interoperate and that it’s harmonized (semantically as well as structurally). Companies like NeoTool and InterfaceWare were providing some very nice HL7 messaging and brokering engine SDKs. Pervasive Software showed off it’s latest general-purpose ETL tool that provides HL7 connectivity as well. Check them all out, they each have the capability of transforming the way your healthcare data is managed within and around devices and other HIT systems.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-18 00:00:00
2006-02-18 00:00:00

HIMSS 2006: Harmonization and interoperability getting more than lip service

Walking around the exhibits with my customers and fellow bloggers at HIMSS this year I found that harmonization and iteroperability were two themes that most vendors were touting. Ubiquity of networks (through wireless technologies) will allow excellent location-based awareness and medical devices will be more and more connected. Given the connected nature of hundreds, perhaps thousands of network-centric devices in our hospitals, we’ll need to make sure that data can interoperate and that it’s harmonized (semantically as well as structurally). Companies like NeoTool and InterfaceWare were providing some very nice HL7 messaging and brokering engine SDKs. Pervasive Software showed off it’s latest general-purpose ETL tool that provides HL7 connectivity as well. Check them all out, they each have the capability of transforming the way your healthcare data is managed within and around devices and other HIT systems.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-18 00:00:00
2006-02-17 00:00:00

J2EE Architecture of Brazilian Healthcare IT System

TheServerSide discusses The J2EE Architecture of Brazilian Healthcare:

In Brazil, every citizen has the right to full healthcare, from primary care to complex procedures as heart transplants, for free, any place in the country. With a population of 180 million people, information is the key to better distribute resources and provide better healthcare.

Taking advantage of the Java based infrastructure of the Brazilian National Health Card, in 2003 a huge project was started aiming to build an integrated web based application to collect patient encounter information, to regulate complex procedures authorizations and to build an integrated patient scheduling system that would allow to schedule consultations and medical procedures in any health provider. This reduces the waiting time, organizes the flow of patients, and greatly improves the quality of care.

The challenge was to build a quality application in a short time frame. This presentation on The J2EE Architecture of the Brazilian Healthcare will focus on how J2EE technology was extensively used to build this mission-critical application and to achieve the level of integration needed. Using J2EE technologies such as EJB, Servlets, JSP, JMS, JTA, and JAAS, it was possible to create a robust and high performance application, with a high level of reuse and flexibility.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-17 00:00:00
2006-02-17 00:00:00

J2EE Architecture of Brazilian Healthcare IT System

TheServerSide discusses The J2EE Architecture of Brazilian Healthcare:

In Brazil, every citizen has the right to full healthcare, from primary care to complex procedures as heart transplants, for free, any place in the country. With a population of 180 million people, information is the key to better distribute resources and provide better healthcare.

Taking advantage of the Java based infrastructure of the Brazilian National Health Card, in 2003 a huge project was started aiming to build an integrated web based application to collect patient encounter information, to regulate complex procedures authorizations and to build an integrated patient scheduling system that would allow to schedule consultations and medical procedures in any health provider. This reduces the waiting time, organizes the flow of patients, and greatly improves the quality of care.

The challenge was to build a quality application in a short time frame. This presentation on The J2EE Architecture of the Brazilian Healthcare will focus on how J2EE technology was extensively used to build this mission-critical application and to achieve the level of integration needed. Using J2EE technologies such as EJB, Servlets, JSP, JMS, JTA, and JAAS, it was possible to create a robust and high performance application, with a high level of reuse and flexibility.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-17 00:00:00
2006-02-13 00:00:00

First annual HIMMS Blogger/Reader meetup was a smashing success

I just wanted to thank all of you that attended the meetup last night in San Diego. We had dozens of people coming in and out and everyone I talked to said they had a great time. Special thanks go to Will Wieder (CandidCIO) for coming up with the idea and to Tim Gee (Mr. Connectologist) and Neil Versel for making the venue arrangements.

We had bloggers and readers from the healthcare policy, provider, financial, IT, infrastructure, media, and vendor communities represented. Our little gathering even had bloggers from forward-looking companies like Sun and Microsoft(who has a great healthcare blog of their own) attending so suffice it to say our Healthcare blogosphere is gaining the attention it deserves. If we pool our resources like this in the future we’ll soon be able to affect policy.

Some of our east coast readers and bloggers were unable to make it because they were shoveling out from many inches (and in some cases feet!) of snow so we send our sympathies. I myself came early so I got to miss the snow in my hometown of Silver Spring, MD which got 9 inches. We especially missed Jack Mason who is trying to put together a “blogposium” where we can have real in-depth discussions on issues important to all of us. I hope he’s able to make it in today so we can get together again.

I hope to setup another blogger meetup at TEPR coming up in Baltimore. If you think you’re interested, drop me a note here.

If you attended the meetup, let me know what you thought and how we could improve it in the future. I’m going to put up a “guestbook” database soon so we can all capture our thoughts for the next go-around.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-13 00:00:00
2006-02-13 00:00:00

First annual HIMMS Blogger/Reader meetup was a smashing success

I just wanted to thank all of you that attended the meetup last night in San Diego. We had dozens of people coming in and out and everyone I talked to said they had a great time. Special thanks go to Will Wieder (CandidCIO) for coming up with the idea and to Tim Gee (Mr. Connectologist) and Neil Versel for making the venue arrangements.

We had bloggers and readers from the healthcare policy, provider, financial, IT, infrastructure, media, and vendor communities represented. Our little gathering even had bloggers from forward-looking companies like Sun and Microsoft (who has a great healthcare blog of their own) attending so suffice it to say our Healthcare blogosphere is gaining the attention it deserves. If we pool our resources like this in the future we’ll soon be able to affect policy.

Some of our east coast readers and bloggers were unable to make it because they were shoveling out from many inches (and in some cases feet!) of snow so we send our sympathies. I myself came early so I got to miss the snow in my hometown of Silver Spring, MD which got 9 inches. We especially missed Jack Mason who is trying to put together a “blogposium” where we can have real in-depth discussions on issues important to all of us. I hope he’s able to make it in today so we can get together again.

I hope to setup another blogger meetup at TEPR coming up in Baltimore. If you think you’re interested, drop me a note here.

If you attended the meetup, let me know what you thought and how we could improve it in the future. I’m going to put up a “guestbook” database soon so we can all capture our thoughts for the next go-around.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-13 00:00:00
2006-02-07 00:00:00

caBIG Healthcare Enterprise Security Architecture White Paper

If you’re working on federated security for multiple health IT systems, take a look at the new NIH caBIG (Cancer Grid) Security Architecture White Paper. I was one of the reviewers on the paper and it is quite well done. It demonstrates the complexity of securing a computing grid, multiple services & systems, and various organizations. And, it provides an evaluation report on various techniques so that you don’t have to do the work all over again in your own project.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-07 00:00:00
2006-02-07 00:00:00

Grand Rounds is up

This week’s Grand Rounds is now available at Science & Politics.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-07 00:00:00
2006-02-07 00:00:00

caBIG Healthcare Enterprise Security Architecture White Paper

If you’re working on federated security for multiple health IT systems, take a look at the new NIH caBIG (Cancer Grid) Security Architecture White Paper. I was one of the reviewers on the paper and it is quite well done. It demonstrates the complexity of securing a computing grid, multiple services & systems, and various organizations. And, it provides an evaluation report on various techniques so that you don’t have to do the work all over again in your own project.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-07 00:00:00
2006-02-07 00:00:00

Grand Rounds is up

This week’s Grand Rounds is now available at Science & Politics.

Filed under: — @ 2006-02-07 00:00:00
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