2006-04-23 00:00:00

New York’s MIT Enterprise Forum hosting “Connected Healthcare” on May 4th

The MIT Enterprise Forum, a great organization that knows how to put together very useful events related to new business opportunities, recently announced the Connected Healthcare gathering to discuss medical technology and communications.

Here’s how they describe the event:

The newly coined phrase “Connected Healthcare” — and the related concept “Healthcare Unbound” — refers to communication and medical technology in, on and around the body that enables healthcare professionals to monitor and care for patients outside of the clinical setting. The market for “Connected Healthcare” is estimated “to reach $34 billion by 2015″. Join our live panel of experts from various segments of healthcare and technology who will discuss the convergence of communication technology and medical devices and provide live demonstrations. The panel will focus on the following issues:

* What are the potential cost savings for expensive chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes?
* How can businesses tap into the $1 trillion health and wellness market as baby boomers age ?
* Who will pay for “Connected Healthcare”?
* How are businesses positioning themselves to participate and profit in this field?
* Where are the most lucrative venture and investment opportunities?

There are quite a few important speakers attending, including:

  • Elizabeth Boehm - Principal Analyst, Healthcare & Life Sciences, Forrester Research
  • George Boyajian, Ph.D - EVP, Strategy and R&D, Living Independently Group
  • William Burkoth - Senior Manager, Strategic Investments Group, Pfizer
  • Mary Furlong - President, Mary Furlong Associates
  • Donald Jones - Vice President, Business Development, Healthcare, Qualcomm
  • Douglas McClure - Corporate Manager, Technology Services, Partners Telemedicine
  • Astro Teller, Ph.D - CEO, Body Media

It should be a good event — it’s taking place May 4th in NYC.

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-23 00:00:00
2006-04-23 00:00:00

Biomedical Ontology in Action

A call for papers went out for an interesting workshop being held in Baltimore later this year. The Biomedical Ontology in Action event, organized by the National Center for Ontology Research (NCOR) and the Working Group on Formal (Bio-)Medical Knowledge Representation of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA), seems like a great gathering of ontology experts.

Here’s how they describe their goal:

This workshop aims at bringing together researchers from a broad range of fields that are related to formal ontology and medical informatics. The goal is to show how current research can be brought to bear on the practical problems associated with the development of applications supported by these ontologies, i.e., to show biomedical ontology “in action”.

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-23 00:00:00
2006-04-23 00:00:00

Games for Health Day on May 9, 2006 in Los Angeles, California

The organizers of Games For Health asked me to announce their Games for Health Day event. I didn’t know much about it before but I find the ideas fascinating. Here’s how they describe the event:

This one-day event, just before the opening of the Electronic Entertainment Expo will bring together researchers, game developers, and health & healthcare professionals for a series of talks devoted to how games and game technologies are addressing critical health & healthcare issues.

Talks will focus on:

??? Health messaging using games
??? Combat & emergency medicine
??? Psychotherapy and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
??? Pain Distraction & Anxiety
??? Cancer treatment
??? Disease management
??? Coping with family ailments
??? Cognitive health
??? Off-the-Shelf consumer health & exergaming titles

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-23 00:00:00
2006-04-23 00:00:00

New York’s MIT Enterprise Forum hosting “Connected Healthcare” on May 4th

The MIT Enterprise Forum, a great organization that knows how to put together very useful events related to new business opportunities, recently announced the Connected Healthcare gathering to discuss medical technology and communications.

Here’s how they describe the event:

The newly coined phrase “Connected Healthcare” — and the related concept “Healthcare Unbound” — refers to communication and medical technology in, on and around the body that enables healthcare professionals to monitor and care for patients outside of the clinical setting. The market for “Connected Healthcare” is estimated “to reach $34 billion by 2015″. Join our live panel of experts from various segments of healthcare and technology who will discuss the convergence of communication technology and medical devices and provide live demonstrations. The panel will focus on the following issues:

* What are the potential cost savings for expensive chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes?
* How can businesses tap into the $1 trillion health and wellness market as baby boomers age ?
* Who will pay for “Connected Healthcare”?
* How are businesses positioning themselves to participate and profit in this field?
* Where are the most lucrative venture and investment opportunities?

There are quite a few important speakers attending, including:

  • Elizabeth Boehm - Principal Analyst, Healthcare & Life Sciences, Forrester Research
  • George Boyajian, Ph.D - EVP, Strategy and R&D, Living Independently Group
  • William Burkoth - Senior Manager, Strategic Investments Group, Pfizer
  • Mary Furlong - President, Mary Furlong Associates
  • Donald Jones - Vice President, Business Development, Healthcare, Qualcomm
  • Douglas McClure - Corporate Manager, Technology Services, Partners Telemedicine
  • Astro Teller, Ph.D - CEO, Body Media

It should be a good event — it’s taking place May 4th in NYC.

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-23 00:00:00
2006-04-23 00:00:00

Biomedical Ontology in Action

A call for papers went out for an interesting workshop being held in Baltimore later this year. The Biomedical Ontology in Action event, organized by the National Center for Ontology Research (NCOR) and the Working Group on Formal (Bio-)Medical Knowledge Representation of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA), seems like a great gathering of ontology experts.

Here’s how they describe their goal:

This workshop aims at bringing together researchers from a broad range of fields that are related to formal ontology and medical informatics. The goal is to show how current research can be brought to bear on the practical problems associated with the development of applications supported by these ontologies, i.e., to show biomedical ontology “in action”.

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-23 00:00:00
2006-04-23 00:00:00

Games for Health Day on May 9, 2006 in Los Angeles, California

The organizers of Games For Health asked me to announce their Games for Health Day event. I didn’t know much about it before but I find the ideas fascinating. Here’s how they describe the event:

This one-day event, just before the opening of the Electronic Entertainment Expo will bring together researchers, game developers, and health & healthcare professionals for a series of talks devoted to how games and game technologies are addressing critical health & healthcare issues.

Talks will focus on:

??? Health messaging using games
??? Combat & emergency medicine
??? Psychotherapy and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
??? Pain Distraction & Anxiety
??? Cancer treatment
??? Disease management
??? Coping with family ailments
??? Cognitive health
??? Off-the-Shelf consumer health & exergaming titles

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-23 00:00:00
2006-04-20 00:00:00

Cooperative Open-source Medical Banking Architecture & Technology Reference Architecture

One of my readers, Ed Dodds, introduced me to the Cooperative Open-source Medical Banking Architecture & Technology reference architecture initiative known as C.O.M.B.A.T.

It seems they are currently cooperating with the OMG (HL7-OMG Healthcare Services Specification Project workgroup) and various open source health initiatives (Eclipse Open Healthcare Framework, OpenEHR).

He said that they anticipate a medical banking grid which would connect Healthcare Savings Accounts, portalized Electronic Medical Records, real-time remittance, and integrated charity care eligibility where medical data is expressed via cell phones, web tablets, and IPTV set top boxes (interactive home healthcare servers) as well as integrated remote disease management.

It’s an interesting standardization and interoperability project and I think we should keep an eye on it to see how things progress.

The guys from Intuit should also take a look to see how they can play.

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-20 00:00:00
2006-04-20 00:00:00

Cooperative Open-source Medical Banking Architecture & Technology Reference Architecture

One of my readers, Ed Dodds, introduced me to the Cooperative Open-source Medical Banking Architecture & Technology reference architecture initiative known as C.O.M.B.A.T.

It seems they are currently cooperating with the OMG (HL7-OMG Healthcare Services Specification Project workgroup) and various open source health initiatives (Eclipse Open Healthcare Framework, OpenEHR).

He said that they anticipate a medical banking grid which would connect Healthcare Savings Accounts, portalized Electronic Medical Records, real-time remittance, and integrated charity care eligibility where medical data is expressed via cell phones, web tablets, and IPTV set top boxes (interactive home healthcare servers) as well as integrated remote disease management.

It’s an interesting standardization and interoperability project and I think we should keep an eye on it to see how things progress.

The guys from Intuit should also take a look to see how they can play.

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-20 00:00:00
2006-04-14 00:00:00

The downside of health IT: seeing fewer patients

Military.com posted an interesting article last week on how the Defense Department???s electronic medical record-keeping system,AHLTA, has reduced patient access to many military outpatient clinics and has lengthened workdays for many doctors.

A few notable quotes from the article:

“It takes on average two to four times more time to document in AHLTA than it did when we used paper,” Nelson said. “For a simple visit like pink eye, patient time can take as little as three to four minutes to diagnose and explain to parents. On a good day [it] takes another three to four minutes to document in the computer.”

“We are so far behind???we officially no longer have routine checkups for infants and toddlers, or annual checkups for older children.

While the folks in charge acknowledge the system is slow and are putting in fixes to improve performance, the explanation for performance problems should be a lesson for all of us in clinical engineering/software architecture and design:

AHLTA is slow, in part, for the same reason it is seen as revolutionary: information on millions of military patients is being stored in a single clinical data repository. But also the system “is single threaded,” said Marinkovich. “That means that for any particular transaction run for a particular user, you have to wait for that to finish before you can start another transaction.” It was designed “so as not to lose data,” Hendricks explained.

The article is worth reading.

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-14 00:00:00
2006-04-14 00:00:00

The downside of health IT: seeing fewer patients

Military.com posted an interesting article last week on how the Defense Department???s electronic medical record-keeping system,AHLTA, has reduced patient access to many military outpatient clinics and has lengthened workdays for many doctors.

A few notable quotes from the article:

“It takes on average two to four times more time to document in AHLTA than it did when we used paper,” Nelson said. “For a simple visit like pink eye,patient time can take as little as three to four minutes to diagnose and explain to parents. On a good day [it] takes another three to four minutes to document in the computer.”

“We are so far behind???we officially no longer have routine checkups for infants and toddlers, or annual checkups for older children.

While the folks in charge acknowledge the system is slow and are putting in fixes to improve performance, the explanation for performance problems should be a lesson for all of us in clinical engineering/software architecture and design:

AHLTA is slow, in part, for the same reason it is seen as revolutionary: information on millions of military patients is being stored in a single clinical data repository. But also the system “is single threaded,” said Marinkovich. “That means that for any particular transaction run for a particular user, you have to wait for that to finish before you can start another transaction.” It was designed “so as not to lose data,” Hendricks explained.

The article is worth reading.

Filed under: — @ 2006-04-14 00:00:00
« Previous Page