2006-07-29 00:00:00

Fish Oils Improve Good Cholesterol Better Than Medication

A study has shown that fish oils are more effective than thestatin drug Lipitor in positively affecting the levels of HDL (”good”) cholesterol in obese and insulin-resistant men. HDL cholesterol protects against atherosclerosis by removing excess cholesterol from arterial cells, and low HDL levels can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, particularly for those who are obese or insulin resistant.

In the six-week study, fish oils and Lipitor were given to 48 men, both separately and combined. Fish oil and Lipitor together greatly lowered plasma triacylglycerols and raised HDL cholesterol levels.

But only fish oil also influenced HDL cholesterol by altering the production and catabolism rates of HDL apolipoproteins (catabolism is the breakdown of complex molecules metabolically into simpler ones). Lipitor did not increase this effect when combined with the fish oils, and did not produce a similar effect on its own.

Mercola.com
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition July 2006; 84 (1) 37-43

Dr. Bryan Bingham
Highland Chiropractic

Filed under: — @ 2006-07-29 00:00:00
2006-07-29 00:00:00

Vegan diet reverses diabetes symptoms, study finds

People who ate a low-fat vegan diet, cutting out all meat and dairy, lowered their blood sugar more and lost more weight than people on a standard American Diabetes Association diet, researchers said this week.

They lowered their cholesterol more and ended up with better kidney function, according to the report published in Diabetes Care, a journal published by the American Diabetes Association.

Participants said the vegan diet was easier to follow than most because they did not measure portions or count calories. Three of the vegan dieters dropped out of the study, compared with eight on the standard diet.

Full article - CNN.com

Dr. Bryan Bingham
Highland Chiropractic

Filed under: — @ 2006-07-29 00:00:00
2006-07-28 00:00:00

Magnesium prevents asthma attacks in children and adolescents.


A new study from Brazil suggests that magnesium supplements may protect against asthma attacks in children and adolescents. Researchers recruited 37 young people (between the ages of seven and 19) and divided them into two groups ? those in one group took 300 mg of magnesium daily; those in the other received a placebo. Since this was a double-blind study, neither theresearchers nor the kids knew who was getting the magnesium. All were allowed to use their asthma inhalers if needed.

After two months, the researchers found that the kids in the magnesium group suffered 28 percent fewer days with asthma attacks than those in the placebo group. What?s more, those who supplemented with magnesium reduced their use of salbutamol, an inhaled drug used to stem attacks, by almost 40 percent. The researchers didn?t check to see if any of the kids were magnesium deficient before the study, but in the United States many adolescents fail to get the RDA of 420 mg of magnesium. The Brazilian study was published in the June 21, 2006, online advance issue of European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Pub Med Abstract

Dr. Bryan Bingham
Highland Chiropractic

Filed under: — @ 2006-07-28 00:00:00
2006-07-28 00:00:00

Mirth Java-based open source HL7 Framework

David Kelton pointed me to this new open source HL7 processing framework called Mirth. I haven’t tried it out yet but it’s pedigree, design, platform, and architecture look really at first glance. Here’s how they describe the tool:

Mirth is an open source cross-platform HL7 interface engine that enables bi-directional sending of HL7 messages between systems and applications over multiple transports. By utilizing an enterprise service bus framework and achannel-based architecture, Mirth allows messages to be filtered, transformed, and routed based on user-defined rules. Creating HL7 interfaces for existing systems becomes easy using the web-based interface and channel creation wizard which associates applications with Mirth engine components.

Definitely worth checking it out. If any of you out there are using, I’d love to hear what you think.

Filed under: — @ 2006-07-28 00:00:00
2006-07-28 00:00:00

Electronic Medical Record Use by Office-based Physicians

The guys over at the BSTI Healthcare IT blog pointed me to an interesting CDC report on physicians’ use of EMRs. A couple of charts show the story:

Filed under: — @ 2006-07-28 00:00:00
2006-07-28 00:00:00

Electronic Medical Record Use by Office-based Physicians

The guys over at the BSTI Healthcare IT blog pointed me to an interesting CDC report on physicians’ use of EMRs. A couple of charts show the story:

Filed under: — @ 2006-07-28 00:00:00
2006-07-28 00:00:00

Mirth Java-based open source HL7 Framework

David Kelton pointed me to this new open source HL7 processing framework called Mirth. I haven’t tried it out yet but it’s pedigree, design, platform, and architecture look really at first glance. Here’s how they describe the tool:

Mirth is an open source cross-platform HL7 interface engine that enables bi-directional sending of HL7 messages between systems and applications over multiple transports. By utilizing an enterprise service bus framework and a channel-based architecture, Mirth allows messages to be filtered, transformed, and routed based on user-defined rules. Creating HL7 interfaces for existing systems becomes easy using the web-based interface and channel creation wizard which associates applications with Mirth engine components.

Definitely worth checking it out. If any of you out there are using, I’d love to hear what you think.

Filed under: — @ 2006-07-28 00:00:00
2006-07-27 00:00:00

Healthcare IT Startup Advice

Over the past few months I’ve been approached by many startups to comment on their ideas and products. I love doing product reviews, especially for startups, because I’ve been an entrepreneur for years and I can’t help but offer advice (even when I’m not asked). Some of the common themes I’ve shared are listed here. Many of you are potential buyers of health IT startup products — what would you tell them?

  • Don’t focus on your competition, focus on the customer. One of the main areas where I’ve seen startups waste their time is making their products “better than the competition”. In health IT the customer is often unhappy with the current suppliers because the vendors probably didn’t listen to their needs. Forget the competition, focus on the customer, and make your products apply to their needs and you’ll have a better chance of success.
  • Simplicity beats complexity. This may seem obvious but many startups want to laden their products with features upon features upon features but forget about ease of use. Concentrate on the smallest number of things your product can do, make those things seductively simple, and don’t chase features. Your customers don’t use your products because it has many features, they use your products because it solves one or more problems that they have. Healthcare IT is complex and unwielding and no single product can do everything so stop trying.
  • Spend time at your local clinic or hospital. It surprises me how many founders have spoken to me about their ideas and when I asked them what they’ve learned from spending a couple of days at a real hospital or clinic they reluctantly mention that they haven’t spent the time there. A common answer I hear is “my brother, who is a doctor, says…” or “my best friend, who works as a nurse, says…” :-) . Don’t just listen to what they say but watch exactly what they do. Like an anthropologist learning about a culture by “living among the people” an engineer or product designer must “live among the customers” to really learn what is going on.
  • Don’t try to chase venture capital, let them chase you. If you spend any time looking for money in your early days you are doing so at the expense of customer acquisition, product development, and other very important milestones. If you have built a useful product and have some customers ready to buy it you will find money. Don’t try to find money before you’ve proven you’ve got something because all you will do is waste 6 to 9 months of your life. Try to fund your own work or get a few friends to pitch in $10k a piece to move things along to full prototyping phase. If you can’t even convince your friends or family to part money to support you, give it up! :-)
  • Figure out how you’ll sell your product to your 10th or 20th client. Most startups can make initial sales — their first few clients are pretty easy to get because of personal contacts or friends of friends. Where they often fail is have the right pricing, deployment, or sales models for getting beyond their initial clients. Healthcare IT is a cottage industry with mostly local small businesses so getting your initial sales is easy. Worry about how you will sell to your first client that you do not know. If you focus your product only on those early clients that are the easiest to sell to, then you will have an even harder time when you get to clients where you don’t have personal contacts.
Filed under: — @ 2006-07-27 00:00:00
2006-07-27 00:00:00

Healthcare IT Startup Advice

Over the past few months I’ve been approached by many startups to comment on their ideas and products. I love doing product reviews, especially for startups, because I’ve been an entrepreneur for years and I can’t help but offer advice (even when I’m not asked). Some of the common themes I’ve shared are listed here. Many of you are potential buyers of health IT startup products — what would you tell them?

  • Don’t focus on your competition, focus on the customer. One of the main areas where I’ve seen startups waste their time is making their products “better than the competition”. In health IT the customer is often unhappy with the current suppliers because the vendors probably didn’t listen to their needs. Forget the competition, focus on the customer, and make your products apply to their needs and you’ll have a better chance of success.
  • Simplicity beats complexity. This may seem obvious but many startups want to laden their products with features upon features upon features but forget about ease of use. Concentrate on the smallest number of things your product can do, make those things seductively simple, and don’t chase features. Your customers don’t use your products because it has many features, they use your products because it solves one or more problems that they have. Healthcare IT is complex and unwielding and no single product can do everything so stop trying.
  • Spend time at your local clinic or hospital. It surprises me how many founders have spoken to me about their ideas and when I asked them what they’ve learned from spending a couple of days at a real hospital or clinic they reluctantly mention that they haven’t spent the time there. A common answer I hear is “my brother, who is a doctor, says…” or “my best friend, who works as a nurse, says…” :-) . Don’t just listen to what they say but watch exactly what they do. Like an anthropologist learning about a culture by “living among the people” an engineer or product designer must “live among the customers” to really learn what is going on.
  • Don’t try to chase venture capital, let them chase you. If you spend any time looking for money in your early days you are doing so at the expense of customer acquisition, product development, and other very important milestones. If you have built a useful product and have some customers ready to buy it you will find money. Don’t try to find money before you’ve proven you’ve got something because all you will do is waste 6 to 9 months of your life. Try to fund your own work or get a few friends to pitch in $10k a piece to move things along to full prototyping phase. If you can’t even convince your friends or family to part money to support you, give it up! :-)
  • Figure out how you’ll sell your product to your 10th or 20th client. Most startups can make initial sales — their first few clients are pretty easy to get because of personal contacts or friends of friends. Where they often fail is have the right pricing, deployment, or sales models for getting beyond their initial clients. Healthcare IT is a cottage industry with mostly local small businesses so getting your initial sales is easy. Worry about how you will sell to your first client that you do not know. If you focus your product only on those early clients that are the easiest to sell to, then you will have an even harder time when you get to clients where you don’t have personal contacts.
Filed under: — @ 2006-07-27 00:00:00
2006-07-26 00:00:00

Teenagers getting high on what?

The 18-year-old French woman was hospitalized with scaly skin on her legs and hands, appearing unsteady and mentally sluggish, doctors said.

They found the condition puzzling, especially since the woman’s twin sister displayed similar, but less severe, symptoms and there was no family history of the problem, the doctors reported in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine that

Several days later, doctors discovered the cause: a bag of mothballs stashed in her hospital room.

The teenagers had been using the mothballs to get high, inhaling air from the bag for about 10 minutes a day because classmates had recommended it. The sicker of the young women also had been chewing half a mothball a day for two months.

The doctors described the high as “dangerous” and most likely under-reported in medical literature.

The teenager told the doctors that she continued to use the mothballs during her hospitalization “because she thought her symptoms were not related to her habit,” said Lionel Feuillet at the Hospital of Timone in Marseille, France.

Mothballs, used to prevent moth larva from getting into clothing, contain paradichlorobenzene, a substance also found in air fresheners and insect repellents that can cause liver and kidney failure, and severe anemia.

Full article: Yahoo Health

Dr. Bryan Bingham
Highland Chiropractic

Filed under: — @ 2006-07-26 00:00:00
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