2006-08-30 00:00:00

The First Symptom…

The first symptom of the top three causes of death is often death. ??How often do we hear someone suffered from a ?sudden heart attack.?? People don?t have sudden heart attacks.? Lifestyle choices stress the body to a point that the heart can no longer function properly.? That ?sudden? heart attack started long before the day the first symptom was experienced.

In my office I don?t see ?sudden heart attacks?; what Isee is ?sudden back attacks.?? ?I just reached over to pick up my sock and my back went out.? ??Unless you have really heavy socks, I doubt that it was the sock that caused the problem.? The sudden back attack is a collection of events and stresses put on the body over a long period of time that culminates to a point of no return.

If you did not change your oil in your car for 3 years and your car broke down, would you call it a sudden car problem or a car problem of neglect.

It is no coincidence that it was the camel’s back that was broken by the straw.

If you are interested in preventing sudden back attacks, speak with your chiropractor today.

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-30 00:00:00
2006-08-28 00:00:00

Here and Now, right now!

The following is an excerpt written by Bill Esteb who provides educational materials for chiropractors. I felt that it was worth sharing and I hope you agree.

Fear means you’re not living in the now.

The powerlessness that accompanies fear is because you’re invested in something you can’t control: the future. In the same way you can’t change the past (the source of guilt), you can’t do much about the future (the source of fear). Our power and influence is totally limited to the present.

We are deceived by the notion that what we do now affects the future. Of course it does. But the consequences that manifest in the future are out of our realm and assume a mechanistic linearity of cause and effect that just isn’t true.

Consider for a moment the countless patients who had miraculous recoveries that you couldn’t have predicted. Or the patients who didn’t respond but should have. The lie is in denying our vitalistic nature and spiritual possibilities. We’re not some pinball whose path can be mathematically predicted!

All we really have is the present. Now. And now. Stay here. It’s a guaranteed fear-free zone.

Dr. Bingham’s Comments:

So much of our life is spent worrying about the future or feeling guilty about the past. Both of which we have no control. We know the effect stress plays on our health and there are very few things that are more stressful than fear and guilt.? Luckily there is only one person who can make you experience these feelings.
Do yourself a favor, stop waiting, feel everything, love completely, give totally and let go.

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-28 00:00:00
2006-08-27 00:00:00

RFID is good for many things but increasing security is not one of them

As I travel around the country and speak to CTOs and CIOs about their hospitals infrastructure, implementing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is one of the major items in everyone’s plans. While I’m always happy that RFID is taking hold in the minds of my clients, what worries me is that RFID is not mature enough yet to protect healthcare IT data but most vendors are not telling their customers during demos and pitches.

The security protocols used in today’s RFID systems risk compromising your infrastructure if they are not used properly (and many times even if they are used properly). When reviewing systems you need to make sure you ask vendors to specifically identify and review the inherent security risks of today’s RFID systems. I’ve seen many RFPs and RFIs where security is not mentioned at all or is given less importance so vendors who respond with proposals don’t supply enough information about vulnerabilities.

RFID is of course designed to bring positive changes to healthcare practice and processes but you need to anticipate the potential threats that can arise with these (often misunderstood) new changes and know the limitations of a vendor’s RFID systems.

With HIPAA and associated medical lawsuits we have already started thinking about privacy so just make sure to extend that analysis to think about confidentiality, integrity, and access to your RFID devices and data. RFID is promising lots of cost savings in the future but if you can’t maintain your security standards with what’s available today it’s better to wait until the RFID manufacturers are ready.

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-27 00:00:00
2006-08-27 00:00:00

RFID is good for many things but increasing security is not one of them

As I travel around the country and speak to CTOs and CIOs about their hospitals infrastructure, implementing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is one of the major items in everyone’s plans. While I’m always happy that RFID is taking hold in the minds of my clients, what worries me is that RFID is not mature enough yet to protect healthcare IT data but most vendors are not telling their customers during demos and pitches.

The security protocols used in today’s RFID systems risk compromising your infrastructure if they are not used properly (and many times even if they are used properly). When reviewing systems you need to make sure you ask vendors to specifically identify and review the inherent security risks of today’s RFID systems. I’ve seen many RFPs and RFIs where security is not mentioned at all or is given less importance so vendors who respond with proposals don’t supply enough information about vulnerabilities.

RFID is of course designed to bring positive changes to healthcare practice and processes but you need to anticipate the potential threats that can arise with these (often misunderstood) new changes and know the limitations of a vendor’s RFID systems.

With HIPAA and associated medical lawsuits we have already started thinking about privacy so just make sure to extend that analysis to think about confidentiality, integrity, and access to your RFID devices and data. RFID is promising lots of cost savings in the future but if you can’t maintain your security standards with what’s available today it’s better to wait until the RFID manufacturers are ready.

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-27 00:00:00
2006-08-26 00:00:00

Web-based QA

 I saw an interesting service offering recently. Check Autoriginate: Intelligent testing made convenient. Here’s how they describe themselves:

HostedQA is the industry’s first web-based QA solution. With a focus on making automated testing convenient and ensuring that the resulting test scripts are intelligent, HostedQA is generations ahead of the competition. No longer do you have to settle for automating only the playback of your tests. HostedQA automates the entire automated testing cycle. We’ll guide you through everything from setting up your databases and application servers to taking simple-to-understand visual screenshots of each step in the test.

 

I haven’t had a chance to play with it yet, but I’m going to check it out further.

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-26 00:00:00
2006-08-26 00:00:00

Web-based QA

 I saw an interesting service offering recently. Check Autoriginate: Intelligent testing made convenient. Here’s how they describe themselves:

HostedQA is the industry’s first web-based QA solution. With a focus on making automated testing convenient and ensuring that the resulting test scripts are intelligent, HostedQA is generations ahead of the competition. No longer do you have to settle for automating only the playback of your tests. HostedQA automates the entire automated testing cycle. We’ll guide you through everything from setting up your databases and application servers to taking simple-to-understand visual screenshots of each step in the test.

 

I haven’t had a chance to play with it yet, but I’m going to check it out further.

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-26 00:00:00
2006-08-24 00:00:00

Please use the new rating system on my blog to tell me how you like articles

I just installed a new rating system that uses some cool AJAX functionality to allow you simply click on a star and rate the quality of the postings you read here. 1 star means the article is very weak and 5 stars means I’ve done great and that you found the article useful.

My objective on this blog is to give unique, actionable advice and pointers to tips and views you won’t always get on other news sites so please take a moment when you read the articles to let me know what you think of each one.

I’ll be watching the ratings and focusing more attention in subject areas with postings that get the highest ratings and staying away from those that get lower ones.

Thanks for reading and thanks in advance for taking 3 seconds and clicking on a star to let me know how you like my postings. Be brutally honest :-)

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-24 00:00:00
2006-08-24 00:00:00

Beware of vendors bearing SOA gifts

The healthcare sector manages an estimated 90 billing healthcare transactions globally; unfortunately, more than 90 percent are happening via phone, fax, or postal mail.

In order for healthcare organizations to better manage today’s information technology requirements, they require modern tools that are designed to work with legacy infrastructures in a service oriented approach/architecture (SOA) where middleware is able to get information to and from multiple systems and applications that have likely been around for decades.

SOA is not a tool, it’s not a library, and it’s definitely not something you can buy and toss into your stack. If you’d like to get an executive summary of SOA, take a look at my Enabling the Service Oriented Enterprise - Overcoming the hype, misconceptions, and pitfalls of SOA PowerPoint presentation.

Even though SOA makes a good deal of sense in the healthcare IT industry, be careful of the hype and existing vendors simply “SOA enabling” their existing software suite. It’s not going to be easy to convert closed legacy healthcare systems into open service oriented applications and databases. Cerner or IDX won’t be able to become “service oriented” by slapping on a label. Epic and Meditech can’t become service oriented given that they couldn’t even make the move to object oriented quickly. Eclipsys and Seimans can’t just put in a messaging system and tell you that they’re now service enabled because they can pass messages between systems.

Before your existing vendors come to you with their SOA message, have them explain to you what they think about SOA, why they think you should care, and why systems that they’ve had around for years are now, suddenly, service oriented. Almost all complex healthcare ITare integration oriented (by utilizing standards such as HL7) but won’t be easily converted to a service oriented quickly or without major changes.

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-24 00:00:00
2006-08-24 00:00:00

$10 Million available to Patient Monitoring Engineering Team

Business 2.0’s The $100 million giveaway article has an offer of $10 million for “an engineering team to design implantable wireless devices capable of 24/7 patient and data monitoring for conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.” It seems there’s decent startup money available if you’ve got the right ideas and can execute. Here’s the snippet from the article in case you’re interested:

Patient Monitoring to Go

The Investor: Corey Mulloy, general partner, Highland Capital Partners
What he’s backed: AccentCare, Archemix, Yoga Works

What he wants now: An engineering team to design implantable wireless devices capable of 24/7 patient and data monitoring for conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.

Companies like Medtronic and Boston Scientific have multibillion-dollar R&D pipelines for medical devices but are increasingly finding it cheaper to simply acquire early-stage companies–so a startup need only get a product to an early testing stage, and can then let a bigger player worry about taking it commercial. Mulloy considers implantable hardware an ideal target market, since it can exploit recent advances in low-power wireless chipsets, materials, and microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS. A device designed to monitor a diabetic patient, for instance, might trigger a bedside alarm for spikes in blood sugar levels, send continuous data to a doctor, or both.
“HMOs are looking for ways to proactively manage individual diseases like congestive heart failure and diabetes,” Mulloy says. “These kinds of devices take us toward that.”

What he’ll invest: $10 million over three years for a functioning prototype, software to manage wireless data, and early-stage trials

Send your pitch to: lmontilla@hcp.com and don’t forget to CC me.

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-24 00:00:00
2006-08-24 00:00:00

Please use the new rating system on my blog to tell me how you like articles

I just installed a new rating system that uses some cool AJAX functionality to allow you simply click on a star and rate the quality of the postings you read here. 1 star means the article is very weak and 5 stars means I’ve done great and that you found the article useful.

My objective on this blog is to give unique, actionable advice and pointers to tips and views you won’t always get on other news sites so please take a moment when you read the articles to let me know what you thinkof each one.

I’ll be watching the ratings and focusing more attention in subject areas with postings that get the highest ratings and staying away from those that get lower ones.

Thanks for reading and thanks in advance for taking 3 seconds and clicking on a star to let me know how you like my postings. Be brutally honest :-)

Filed under: — @ 2006-08-24 00:00:00
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