2006-11-15 00:00:00

Do micro-job sites offer better jobs?

There’s recently been a steady uptick in new micro-job sites that eschew the “single site fits all” strategy pioneered by Monster.com. Basically, the new niche-oriented sites focus on specific jobs of very specific markets. Well, I bring this up because I ran across Med IT Jobs which is focused on, you guessed it, healthcare IT and medical informatics jobs.

While it’s pretty small and doesn’t represent many companies yet, it’s free for a limited time so it’s worth giving it a shot if you’re looking for a job or if you’re an employer with an open position. Of course, it requires you to enter all your resume information yet again — this is one of the principal weaknesses of micro-sites: if I register at 10 micro-sites, I have to enter my information 10 times instead of just once at something like Monster.com.

What do you guys think about these micro- or niche-oriented job sites? Do they have better jobs or are the jobs just easier to find?

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-15 00:00:00
2006-11-15 00:00:00

Do micro-job sites offer better jobs?

There’s recently been a steady uptick in new micro-job sites that eschew the “single site fits all” strategy pioneered by Monster.com. Basically, the new niche-oriented sites focus on specific jobs of very specific markets. Well, I bring this up because I ran across Med IT Jobs which is focused on, you guessed it, healthcare IT and medical informatics jobs.

While it’s pretty small and doesn’t represent many companies yet, it’s free for a limited time so it’s worth giving it a shot if you’re looking for a job or if you’re an employer with an open position. Of course, it requires you to enter all your resume information yet again — this is one of the principal weaknesses of micro-sites: if I register at 10 micro-sites, I have to enter my information 10 times instead of just once at something like Monster.com.

What do you guys think about these micro- or niche-oriented job sites? Do they have better jobs or are the jobs just easier to find?

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-15 00:00:00
2006-11-14 00:00:00

Disaster and Emergency Response Systems

All hospitals must have disaster and emergency response systems in place. FEMA’s National Incidence Management System (NIMS) is something that all of us need to be aware of and be able to obtain alerts from and provide information to. I ran across FastCommand, a system which implements the NIMS recommendations, and thought it might be something useful if you don’t have automated systems in place. It has one of my favorite attributes: it’s a web-based solution. They claim to enable hospitals to comply with national emergency response requirements when responding to both minor incidents and major emergency situations. I haven’t had a chance to do a trial yet but it seems useful.

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-14 00:00:00
2006-11-14 00:00:00

Keep Those Neurons Firring With This Addictive Game

Our brain is no different from the rest of our body, either you use it or you lose it. The brain takes a lot of energy to keep running.? If it is not being used the body sees it as a waste of energy.

Researchers have showed us the benefits of crossword puzzle, knitting and reading to name a few. ? This fun, yet addictive game can keep the brain working and also provide a much needing break from work.

Click the following link to get your brain firing:

?Addictive Game

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-14 00:00:00
2006-11-14 00:00:00

AMIA’s Report on the Secondary use of Healthcare Data

One of my readers, Tim McLung, did me a huge favor recently by answering a question I posed in my recent post Who Owns Your Data? I asked if anyone had seen some work done in this area about data ownership and Tim left a comment pointing to the recently completed report from AMIA entitled “Toward a National Framework for the Secondary Use of Health Data“. Thanks, Tim.

The document doesn’t answer all my questions but it’s a pretty good start because there are numerous recommendations. Here’s introduction from the executive summary:

Secondary use of health data refers to non-direct care use of personal health information (PHI), including but not limited to analysis, research, quality and safety measurement, public health, payment, provider certification or accreditation, and marketing and other business (including strictly commercial) activities. Secondary use of health data can enhance health care experiences for individuals, expand knowledge about disease and appropriate treatments, strengthen understanding about the effectiveness and efficiency of our health care systems, support public health and security goals, and aid businesses in meeting the needs of their customers. Yet, access to and secondary use of data poses complex ethical, political, technical, and social challenges. Many of the issues surrounding the secondary use of health data are not new. These issues are however increasingly critical and complex in light of public and private sector activities that are expanding the volume of data available to be used and the availability of tools to access that health data. The lack of coherent policies and practices for the secondary use of health data presents a significant impediment to the goal of strengthening the U.S. health care system. A national framework for the secondary use of health data that includes a robust infrastructure of policies, standards, and best practices is needed to facilitate the broad and repeated collection, storage, aggregation, linkage, and transmission of health data with appropriate protections for legitimate secondary use.

If anyone else knows about similar work, please let me know since it’s an area I’m quite interested in.

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-14 00:00:00
2006-11-14 00:00:00

Disaster and Emergency Response Systems

All hospitals must have disaster and emergency response systems in place. FEMA’s National Incidence Management System (NIMS) is something that all of us need to be aware of and be able to obtain alerts from and provide information to. I ran across FastCommand, a system which implements the NIMS recommendations, and thought it might be something useful if you don’t have automated systems in place. It has one of my favorite attributes: it’s a web-based solution. They claim to enable hospitals to comply with national emergency response requirements when responding to both minor incidents and major emergency situations. I haven’t had a chance to do a trial yet but it seems useful.

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-14 00:00:00
2006-11-14 00:00:00

AMIA’s Report on the Secondary use of Healthcare Data

One of my readers, Tim McLung, did me a huge favor recently by answering a question I posed in my recent post Who Owns Your Data? I asked if anyone had seen some work done in this area about data ownership and Tim left a comment pointing to the recently completed report from AMIA entitled “Toward a National Framework for the Secondary Use of Health Data“. Thanks, Tim.

The document doesn’t answer all my questions but it’s a pretty good start because there are numerous recommendations. Here’s introduction from the executive summary:

Secondary use of health data refers to non-direct care use of personal health information (PHI), including but not limited to analysis, research, quality and safety measurement, public health, payment, provider certification or accreditation, and marketing and other business (including strictly commercial) activities. Secondary use of health data can enhance health care experiences for individuals, expand knowledge about disease and appropriate treatments, strengthen understanding about the effectiveness and efficiency of our health care systems, support public health and security goals, and aid businesses in meeting the needs of their customers. Yet, access to and secondary use of data poses complex ethical, political, technical, and social challenges. Many of the issues surrounding the secondary use of health data are not new. These issues are however increasingly critical and complex in light of public and private sector activities that are expanding the volume of data available to be used and the availability of tools to access that health data. The lack of coherent policies and practices for the secondary use of health data presents a significant impediment to the goal of strengthening the U.S. health care system. A national framework for the secondary use of health data that includes a robust infrastructure of policies, standards, and best practices is needed to facilitate the broad and repeated collection, storage, aggregation, linkage, and transmission of health data with appropriate protections for legitimate secondary use.

If anyone else knows about similar work, please let me know since it’s an area I’m quite interested in.

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-14 00:00:00
2006-11-13 00:00:00

HIMSS07 Conference Blog Launched

This summer I wrote about HIMSS’ interest in bloggers and blogging and I got a number of positive comments indicating that we’d all be happy to see HIMSS join the Blogosphere. Well, HIMSS has launched their first blog, centered around the 2007 HIMSS Annual Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans. Available at www.HIMSSLive.com, the blog is designed to provide the most current information about the conference along with related healthcare IT news.

Like any blog, HIMSS07 Live! is designed to start a conversation with the community, in this case the entire HCIT community that HIMSS represents. So, check it out and start letting them know what you think.

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-13 00:00:00
2006-11-13 00:00:00

HIMSS07 Conference Blog Launched

This summer I wrote about HIMSS’ interest in bloggers and blogging and I got a number of positive comments indicating that we’d all be happy to see HIMSS join the Blogosphere. Well, HIMSS has launched their first blog, centered around the 2007 HIMSS Annual Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans. Available at www.HIMSSLive.com, the blog is designed to provide the most current information about the conference along with related healthcare IT news.

Like any blog, HIMSS07 Live! is designed to start a conversation with the community, in this case the entire HCIT community that HIMSS represents. So, check it out and start letting them know what you think.

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-13 00:00:00
2006-11-12 00:00:00

Clear the Stagnant ?Chi? (energy) in Your Home

The following post is from Gwyenne Warner who is a Feng Shui practitioner with 10,000 blessings. She can be reached at 503-747-3463 for more information.

Daily, open your windows wide for ten minutes and allow the fresh air to support you removing all of your clutter and stagnant energy (dead flowers or plants, cremation ashes, negative images) inside and outside of your home.
Then deep clean (with non-toxic products enhanced with essential oils?I like the Method products from Target, myself) while imagining you are sweeping away allillness, toxins and stagnation.? Remove all toxic air and water (with filtration systems) as soon as you are able.
You can also burn ?chen pi ? (dried tangerine peel) to help lift the energy and clear that tired, depressed or stagnant chi (contact me if you need some).

Filed under: — @ 2006-11-12 00:00:00
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