2007-03-19 00:00:00

How to do positive patient ID in consumer and kiosk settings

I often get asked about how to positively identify a patient in a consumer or kiosk setting (shared computer environments also). For example, if a patient comes in and you want to hand them a computer to do some data entry with, how would be able to positively identify the patient as a specific person? And, you need to be able to do this without “logging them in” or require them to remember a password.

Basically, for this kind of requirement I’ve been recommending folks use the kind of security that credit bureaus do to identify people who want their credit scores (banks want you to know who they are, credit bureaus need to know who you are). So, if you want to sign me into a kiosk but need to verify my information you could present a screen such as the following:

1. What is your name? _________ (I would type in “Shahid Shah”)

2. If you found my name in the database, you could present another screen with the following types of questions.

Please verify your current address:
* choice A (an address like ‘2313 anywhere street’)
* choice B (an address like ‘4717 another street’)
* choice C (an address like ‘6616 anywhere boulevard’)

Please verify your current employer:
* choice A
* choice B
* choice C

You can ask a set of 3 or 4 questions and provide information from their last visit (submission) instead of or in addition to a password. The types of questions to ask and the choices you want to provide would be determined by how secure you want the system to be and how “Positive” your PPID (positive patient ID) requirements happen to be.

If you’ve used other techniques, please share!

Filed under: — @ 2007-03-19 00:00:00
2007-03-19 00:00:00

HL7 library for Ruby Released

Mark Guzman over at Tech Addict just announced the 0.1.23 release of an HL7 parser for Ruby. I’ve been doing a bunch of Rails stuff lately and this should come in handy when I need HL7 parsing. I haven’t tried it out yet, but here’s what Mark said is in there:

  • Flexible parsing support
  • MLLP support
  • Provides a simple DSL (domain specific language) for defining segments (Ruby style)
  • Allows for arbitrary manipulation of segment data
  • Automatic segment ordering (via sort)
  • Familiar Ruby Array/Enumerable semantics

How to get it:

gem install ruby-hl7

or grab the tarball from http://rubyforge.org/frs/?group_id=3261

More details are available here:

  • http://hasno.info/2007/3/18/ruby-hl7-0-1-23-released
  • http://trac.hasno.info/ruby-hl7
  • http://ruby-hl7.rubyforge.org
Filed under: — @ 2007-03-19 00:00:00
2007-03-19 00:00:00

How to do positive patient ID in consumer and kiosk settings

I often get asked about how to positively identify a patient in a consumer or kiosk setting (shared computer environments also). For example, if a patient comes in and you want to hand them a computer to do some data entry with, how would be able to positively identify the patient as a specific person? And, you need to be able to do this without “logging them in” or require them to remember a password.

Basically, for this kind of requirement I’ve been recommending folks use the kind of security that credit bureaus do to identify people who want their creditscores (banks want you to know who they are, credit bureaus need to know who you are). So, if you want to sign me into a kiosk but need to verify my information you could present a screen such as the following:

1. What is your name? _________ (I would type in “Shahid Shah”)

2. If you found my name in the database, you could present another screen with the following types of questions.

Please verify your current address:
* choice A (an address like ‘2313 anywhere street’)
* choice B (an address like ‘4717 another street’)
* choice C (an address like ‘6616 anywhere boulevard’)

Please verify your current employer:
* choice A
* choice B
* choice C

You can ask a set of 3 or 4 questions and provide information from their last visit (submission) instead of or in addition to a password. The types of questions to ask and the choices you want to provide would be determined by how secure you want the system to be and how “Positive” your PPID (positive patient ID) requirements happen to be.

If you’ve used other techniques, please share!

Filed under: — @ 2007-03-19 00:00:00
2007-03-19 00:00:00

HL7 library for Ruby Released

Mark Guzman over at Tech Addict just announced the 0.1.23 release of an HL7 parser for Ruby. I’ve been doing a bunch of Rails stuff lately and this should come in handy when I need HL7 parsing. I haven’t tried it out yet, but here’s what Mark said is in there:

  • Flexible parsing support
  • MLLP support
  • Provides a simple DSL (domain specific language) for defining segments (Ruby style)
  • Allows for arbitrary manipulation of segment data
  • Automatic segment ordering (via sort)
  • Familiar Ruby Array/Enumerable semantics

How to get it:

gem install ruby-hl7

or grab the tarball from http://rubyforge.org/frs/?group_id=3261

More details are available here:

  • http://hasno.info/2007/3/18/ruby-hl7-0-1-23-released
  • http://trac.hasno.info/ruby-hl7
  • http://ruby-hl7.rubyforge.org
Filed under: — @ 2007-03-19 00:00:00
2007-03-18 00:00:00

Helping Health IT firms commercialize their offerings

I have been working closely with Larta www.larta.org and the NIH funded Healthcare IT companies they are assisting with commercialization. These companies have some very interesting technologies and with the right guidance and help, have tremendous market potential. Larta will be conducting a workshop in Washington DC and on March 29 and 30, 2007, these NIH funded Healthcare IT startups will pitch their technologies to an audience of mentors and advisors comprising of investors, industry personnel and consultants.

I invite you to network with some innovative companies with excellent ideas, NIH, and fellow mentors, and share your expertise with startups in need of your technology and business know-how. For more information contact the NIH-CAP Program Director, Larta Institute, at ksood@larta.org or 213.765.4824.

Please seriously consider joining me later this month in DC and provide your advice to these startups. I’ve been invited a number of times to talk to them and they’re very open to new ideas and welcome the input.

Filed under: — @ 2007-03-18 00:00:00
2007-03-18 00:00:00

A free Ad-based EMR

I wanted to call your attention to Dr. Scott Shreve’s posting about Practice Fusion and ad-driven revenue. Having built out half dozen EMRs in my career, it’s good to see a company like Practice Fusion giving adware a try — I don’t think they have anything to lose.

I hope they can succeed where other EMRs have failed (or at least not done so well). The technology behind EMRs is embarrassingly easy to create nowadays — most EMRs are just simple databases that act like electronic typewriters and simple filing cabinets. In fact, kids in high school doing game programming are doing more difficult things with computer science concepts than EMRs. What’s really hard about EMRs are dealing with the integration and usability headaches — which are no easy tasks. However, if you create a single-site solution where all the users connect together in one place and not have to worry about cross-site integration and the mismatch between concepts across EMR packages then it could be a winning solution.

Apparently hundreds of docs have already signed up for the free Practice Fusion site. If they can get the adware EMR concept accepted perhaps this will open up other healthcare IT service solutions in the same category. Lots to look forward to!

Filed under: — @ 2007-03-18 00:00:00
2007-03-18 00:00:00

Helping Health IT firms commercialize their offerings

I have been working closely with Larta www.larta.org and the NIH funded Healthcare IT companies they are assisting with commercialization. These companies have some very interesting technologies and with the right guidance and help, have tremendous market potential. Larta will be conducting a workshop in Washington DC and on March 29 and 30, 2007, these NIH funded Healthcare IT startups will pitch their technologies to an audience of mentors and advisors comprising of investors, industry personnel and consultants.

I invite you to network with some innovative companies with excellent ideas, NIH, and fellow mentors, and share your expertise with startups in need of your technology and business know-how. For more information contact the NIH-CAP Program Director, Larta Institute, at ksood@larta.org or 213.765.4824.

Please seriously consider joining me later this month in DC and provide your advice to these startups. I’ve been invited a number of times to talk to them and they’re very open to new ideas and welcome the input.

Filed under: — @ 2007-03-18 00:00:00
2007-03-18 00:00:00

A free Ad-based EMR

I wanted to call your attention to Dr. Scott Shreve’s posting about Practice Fusion and ad-driven revenue. Having built out half dozen EMRs in my career, it’s good to see a company like Practice Fusion giving adware a try — I don’t think they have anything to lose.

I hope they can succeed where other EMRs have failed (or at least not done so well). The technology behind EMRs is embarrassingly easy to create nowadays — most EMRs are just simple databases that act like electronic typewriters and simple filing cabinets. In fact, kids in high school doing game programming are doing more difficult things with computer science concepts than EMRs. What’s really hard about EMRs are dealing with the integration and usability headaches — which are no easy tasks. However, if you create a single-site solution where all the users connect together in one place and not have to worry about cross-site integration and the mismatch between concepts across EMR packages then it could be a winning solution.

Apparently hundreds of docs have already signed up for the free Practice Fusion site. If they can get the adware EMR concept accepted perhaps this will open up other healthcare IT service solutions in the same category. Lots to look forward to!

Filed under: — @ 2007-03-18 00:00:00
2007-03-09 00:00:00

Open Source data mapping and transformation tool from NIH

My friend Jeremy Hulick recently wrote to me about NIH’s caAdaptor tool, an open source product he learned about at the recent CaBIG conference. Here’s how the authors describe it:

caAdapter is an open source tool set that facilitates data mapping and transformation among different kinds of data sources including HL7 v2 and v3 messages, Study Data Tabulation Model (SDTM) data sets, object models and data models. For HL7 v3 messages, it possesses the capability to perform vocabulary validation by integrating with NCICB caCORE components and provides web service access for easy application integration. caAdapter has a component-based architecture to support message development and reporting using standard data formats. caAdapter also provides the capability to perform vocabulary validation and integrates with NCICB caCORE components. caAdapter has a component-based architecture that offers a tool set to support data mapping and transformation, and standard data reporting.

caAdapter Core Components

  • CSV to HL7 v3 Mapping and Transformation Service
  • caAdapter Web Service
  • Model Mapping Service
  • SDTM Mapping and Transformation Service
  • HL7 v2 to v3 Conversion Service

Jeremy was interested in HL7 2.x to 3.x mapping and he had the following to say about the pros and cons of using caAdaptor to convert an HL7 v2 CSV source file to an HL7 v3 xml file.

Pros

  • Intuitive interface - easy to upload source files and the layout is easy to interpret
  • Mapping source data to target elements is relatively easy
  • Applying Mapping Functions is easy - ex. using a concatenate function to combine two source data fields into a single destination element
  • Generating source into multiple formats is easy - converts to XML, CSV, or a relation data model

 Cons

  • Source mapping from HL7 v2 to v3 is manual - there were no intelligent defaults (perhaps this is the nature of the of the business domain?)
  • Needs a domain expert to properly convert from v2 to v3
  • Display of mapped elements does not fit on the screen (minor issue). It is difficult to navigate the links between source and destination elements
  • Not web enabled - uses Java Swing

Thanks, Jeremy for sharing your review with us.

Filed under: — @ 2007-03-09 00:00:00
2007-03-09 00:00:00

Open Source data mapping and transformation tool from NIH

My friend Jeremy Hulick recently wrote to me about NIH’s caAdaptor tool, an open source product he learned about at the recent CaBIG conference. Here’s how the authors describe it:

caAdapter is an open source tool set that facilitates data mapping and transformation among different kinds of data sources including HL7 v2 and v3 messages, Study Data Tabulation Model (SDTM) data sets,object models and data models. For HL7 v3 messages, it possesses the capability to perform vocabulary validation by integrating with NCICB caCORE components and provides web service access for easy application integration. caAdapter has a component-based architecture to support message development and reporting using standard data formats. caAdapter also provides the capability to perform vocabulary validation and integrates with NCICB caCORE components. caAdapter has a component-based architecture that offers a tool set to support data mapping and transformation, and standard data reporting.

caAdapter Core Components

  • CSV to HL7 v3 Mapping and Transformation Service
  • caAdapter Web Service
  • Model Mapping Service
  • SDTM Mapping and Transformation Service
  • HL7 v2 to v3 Conversion Service

Jeremy was interested in HL7 2.x to 3.x mapping and he had the following to say about the pros and cons of using caAdaptor to convert an HL7 v2 CSV source file to an HL7 v3 xml file.

Pros

  • Intuitive interface - easy to upload source files and the layout is easy to interpret
  • Mapping source data to target elements is relatively easy
  • Applying Mapping Functions is easy - ex. using a concatenate function to combine two source data fields into a single destination element
  • Generating source into multiple formats is easy - converts to XML, CSV, or a relation data model

 Cons

  • Source mapping from HL7 v2 to v3 is manual - there were no intelligent defaults (perhaps this is the nature of the of the business domain?)
  • Needs a domain expert to properly convert from v2 to v3
  • Display of mapped elements does not fit on the screen (minor issue). It is difficult to navigate the links between source and destination elements
  • Not web enabled - uses Java Swing

Thanks, Jeremy for sharing your review with us.

Filed under: — @ 2007-03-09 00:00:00
« Previous Page