2007-07-30 04:03:26

Donald Trump


Raw Story - Sachin Tendulkar was closing in on his 38th Test century as India extended their advantage at Trent Bridge here on Sunday. At lunch, on the third day of the second Test, India were 338 for three, a lead of 140. Tendulkar, already the world record

Blame it on the beauty, and sex
Chicago Tribune - Donald Trump’s “You’re fired” on the “Apprentice” was seen as strong and decisive; in a woman that behavior is considered abrasive or “bitchy.” In a 2004 interview, Black stood up for his wife, and for himself. “The attempt to portray her as a Marie

ETHICAL CONDUCT NOW NO. 1 PRIORITY
New York Post - At the first table West led a trump, and South won and craftily tried an immediate diamond finesse. Sure enough, when East took the queen he led a heart, not a club from his king. It was a mistake, and everybody noticed: South claimed 12 tricks! In

‘View’ eyeing Goldberg, Shepherd as hosts
Newsday - In less than a year on the show, O’Donnell was a never-ending source of headlines for her feuds with Donald Trump and co-star Elisabeth Hasselbeck. Goldberg is one of the few performers to earn Emmy, Grammy, Tony and Academy awards in her versatile

ATLANTIC CITY NOTEBOOK 7.26.07
Asbury Park Press - The company lent its expertise to several other Atlantic City properties, including Trump Taj Mahal and Steel Pier, Harrah s Entertainment, Showboat Casino Hotel, the Atlantic City Hilton, and the Borgata. Grucci has nothing to do with the implosion

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-30 04:03:26
2007-07-29 04:03:18

Donald Trump


Serbianna - George Bulgarian Orthodox Church, which was meeting in an East Toledo home, according to Evanka Dimitroff, 78. “He was a good person — caring and interesting. You could talk to him,” Mrs. Dimitroff said. She said the archbishop helped with the

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-29 04:03:18
2007-07-29 00:00:00

E-mail good for patients, not so much for docs

There was an interesting article in the Portland Business Journal a few weeks ago which intimated that as physicians increase their use of e-mail with patients, their incomes may decline:

For physicians’ offices, e-mail between patients and providers may prove a mixed blessing.

Patients who use e-mail to communicate with their medical providers are apt to visit the doctor’s office less and are also less likely to phone the doctor’s office, according to recent data from the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research.

Technology usually means higher productivity and less work all around; if you run a business such as a help desk or service center email is great since each call you receive means extra expense. But, if you’re a doctor and you’re getting paid per patient visit it helps to have more patients coming into the office, not fewer.

the Portland Business Journal cites a report by Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research which indicates that patients who consult with their physicians via e-mail are less likely to visit their physician and less likely to call their doctor’s office. Kaiser reported a decline of almost 10% in office visits for patients who use e-mail (the bad news). The good news is that also report that patients who use email did not call their doctors’ offices as much (as we all know docs don’t get paid for phone calls so a reduction there is a good thing).

Of course patients making fewer doctors visits is great for insurers and employers but for docs who depend on office visits to help maintain their incomes it’s actually a wake up call to make sure they give due consideration to whether or not e-mailing is such a good thing. If they care only about their patients, it’s a great idea; however, if they also care about their income, well, that’s another story.

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-29 00:00:00
2007-07-29 00:00:00

E-mail good for patients, not so much for docs

There was an interesting article in the Portland Business Journal a few weeks ago which intimated that as physicians increase their use of e-mail with patients, their incomes may decline:

For physicians’ offices, e-mail between patients and providers may prove a mixed blessing.

Patients who use e-mail to communicate with their medical providers are apt to visit the doctor’s office less and are also less likely to phone the doctor’s office, according to recent data from the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research.

Technology usually means higher productivity and less work all around; if you run a business such as a help desk or service center email is great since each call you receive means extra expense. But, if you’re a doctor and you’re getting paid per patient visit it helps to have more patients coming into the office, not fewer.

the Portland Business Journal cites a report by Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research which indicates that patients who consult with their physicians via e-mail are less likely to visit their physician and less likely to call their doctor’s office. Kaiser reported a decline of almost 10% in office visits for patients who use e-mail (the bad news). The good news is that also report that patients who use email did not call their doctors’ offices as much (as we all know docs don’t get paid for phone calls so a reduction there is a good thing).

Of course patients making fewer doctors visits is great for insurers and employers but for docs who depend on office visits to help maintain their incomes it’s actually a wake up call to make sure they give due consideration to whether or not e-mailing is such a good thing. If they care only about their patients, it’s a great idea; however, if they also care about their income, well, that’s another story.

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-29 00:00:00
2007-07-28 04:03:19

Donald Trump


Serbianna - George Bulgarian Orthodox Church, which was meeting in an East Toledo home, according to Evanka Dimitroff, 78. “He was a good person — caring and interesting. You could talk to him,” Mrs. Dimitroff said. She said the archbishop helped with the

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-28 04:03:19
2007-07-28 00:00:00

Making the Transition

The following is part two of a four part series provided by Sean Coster, founder of Complete Running Programs (CRP). For more information about CRP visit www.crpusa.com.
Making the move from base training to faster running for summer 10K ??? Half Marathon???s. Part 2 of a 4 part series on training principles for these distances.

As you page through your training log and enjoy consistent weeks of steadily increasing weekly mileage, a gradual growth in the distance of your long run and a feeling of strength and endurance, you think to your self, ???what next???? in the preparation for a personal best for the 10K to Half Marathon. The answer of course is???faster running.

Faster running that is done with a specific purpose to each workout will enable the athlete who has diligently built a solid foundation to make an effective transition to faster running without injury. If you are unsure if your base building phase was done in a well rounded manner by incorporating a growth in the weekly volume of miles run, running specific strength training and strides then refer to December???s article ???Foundations of Base Training??? for guidance on this topic. If you are ready to make the transition to faster running then follow CRP???s concepts below on how to do so.

Taking the strength and endurance you???ve built during your base training and spinning it into fitness specific to race a 10K to half marathon takes work in a few areas. Improving the pace that you are running when blood lactic acid begins to significantly increase is one of these areas (definition of Lactate/Ventilatory Threshold). A highly effective means on improving your pace at Lactate Threshold is to incorporate a type of Fartlek running. Fartlek running has been used in the United States since the 50???s in various forms. For improvement in distances from 10K to the Half Marathon I suggest the following parameters for your fartlek. Keep the distance run during the ???on??? or fast portion to between 30 seconds and 2 minutes. The intensity of this running should be slightly faster than your current Lactate Threshold pace. Each bout of this faster running should be followed by a float period or ???off??? phase that has you running easy for the same amount of time as the ???on??? period. This can be done on a run of any distance after an appropriate warm up. The total distance of fartlek running with the ???on???s??? and ???off???s??? can range from 4-8 miles depending on the athlete. A coach will be able to incorporate this running into your program with appropriate prescription of the fartlek running made for weekly volume of miles run.

Hill training has long been a means of building strength and endurance for distance runners. Hill running takes many forms, and each offers its own pay off to the runner. For the transition period we are speaking of I recommend incorporating a type of hill running that many find unique. Finding a short and fairly steep (8-12 %) hill that you can run up for 8-10 seconds is all you need. After a good warm up run followed by a dynamic series of running drills make your way to your hill. Running this hill near 100% of your top speed for 10 seconds 6-8 times is all you need. The key to this workout is to take lots of rest between repetitions. I would recommend anywhere from 3-5 minutes rest. This uncommonly long bout of restwill allow your body to go through a refractory period in which you can get more muscle fibers to participate in your all out burst for the top of your short and steep hill. This recruitment of muscle fibers is exactly the ???why??? behind such a short fast workout for 10K to half marathoners. Many benefits are derived from doing such a workout, but one is that you are now bringing more help (in the form of muscle fibers) to the work of running at many different distances. Therefore you are building a foundation for fatigue resistance for future running at race pace. Do to the extremely fast nature of this running a proper warm up is essential to this workout.

Running economy is the amount of energy expended to run at a particular pace. We can all agree that being stingy is a good thing in distance running, and by spending less energy running our race pace we can likely improve our performances. In an effort to stimulate maximum running economy at race pace I recommend another type of shorter distance running for the transition period of 10K to the Half Marathon training. The goal is to find a distance you can run at 90% of your top speed, or roughly your 800m-1600m race pace, at for 60 seconds. For some of the worlds best runners this may be 400m or slightly further, for others it may be 250-300m. Let???s say it???s 300m for you. Head to the track and engage in your dynamic warm up, the one you would do before each workout or race, and get ready to run fast for 60 seconds. Keying on the best form possible and an even distribution of effort for the 60 seconds take one repetition. After this bout of running take 3-4 minutes of rest, until fully recovered then do another. This workout is successful if the runs each consistent in there intensity and excellent form can be maintained. The total number of these repetitions is very relative to your current fitness and ability. It can range from 6-20 depending on the athlete. CRP???s coaching staff can help you work workout???s like this into your overall training program.

Making the transition from base training to faster running can seem like an intimidating task. But when you develop a plan that focuses on key areas of improvement using focused workouts your mind will rest easy knowing your fitness is improving from the base you have built. Keep in mind that these training concepts need to be appropriately incorporated into your overall goals as an athlete by a coach. Self education is an important aspect of each runners training, and so is working with coach in an advisory role.

Long may you run,

Sean Coster
Founder ??? Complete Running Programs

Let Complete Running Programs help you reach your goals in running with our expert coaching staff???s unique approach to developing distance runners of various abilities. Visit www.crpusa.com to learn about our services.

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-28 00:00:00
2007-07-23 00:00:00

If you can’t repeat it, don’t bother automating it

There’s been plenty of discussion in both literature and general media about how most software projects fail. There are plenty of reasons for failed projects: from inadequate requirements gathering to poor project management to plain incompetence. Some of the problem starts at the C-Suite where projects are actually identified and initiated — for asking to automate (presumably with software) something that maybe has no business being automated.

My simple advice to most CEOs and CIOs about project management starts with a question: can you methodically and manually repeat the thing you are trying to automate? If the answer to that question is “no” then no PMO, no project management technique, not even the smartest most talented people in the world can help automate something that can’t at least be repeated consistenly manually.

This advice of asking a simple question about repeatability might sound so obvious as to not even bother asking it but it becomes perilous not to do so. At the heart of most failed software automation attempts is a failure to understand the workflow and gather the right requirements. That’s pretty easy to figure out. What’s not so easy to figure out is: why is the workflow so hard to gather requirements for? It’s probably because the workflow, while it seems consistent at the high level, isn’t repeatable enough consistently to describe in software. Perhaps parts of it are, but maybe the entire workflow isn’t.

So, as a senior executive that may not be leading the project, but may be green lighting it, what you need to do before making a decision is have your project managers describe that they can clearly repeat (manually and consistently) what they are trying to automate. If not, get the process engineering guys in there to work on the process before the geeks get in there to work on the technology. The rule is simple: if you can’t repeat it manually, don’t bother automating it.

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-23 00:00:00
2007-07-23 00:00:00

If you can’t repeat it, don’t bother automating it

There’s been plenty of discussion in both literature and general media about how most software projects fail. There are plenty of reasons for failed projects: from inadequate requirements gathering to poor project management to plain incompetence. Some of the problem starts at the C-Suite where projects are actually identified and initiated — for asking to automate (presumably with software) something that maybe has no business being automated.

My simple advice to most CEOs and CIOs about project management starts with a question: can you methodically and manually repeat the thing you are trying to automate? If the answer to that question is “no” then no PMO, no project management technique, not even the smartest most talented people in the world can help automate something that can’t at least be repeated consistenly manually.

This advice of asking a simple question about repeatability might sound so obvious as to not even bother asking it but it becomes perilous not to do so. At the heart of most failed software automation attempts is a failure to understand the workflow and gather the right requirements. That’s pretty easy to figure out. What’s not so easy to figure out is: why is the workflow so hard to gather requirements for? It’s probably because the workflow, while it seems consistent at the high level, isn’t repeatable enough consistently to describe in software. Perhaps parts of it are, but maybe the entire workflow isn’t.

So, as a senior executive that may not be leading the project, but may be green lighting it, what you need to do before making a decision is have your project managers describe that they can clearly repeat (manually and consistently) what they are trying to automate. If not, get the process engineering guys in there to work on the process before the geeks get in there to work on the technology. The rule is simple: if you can’t repeat it manually, don’t bother automating it.

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-23 00:00:00
2007-07-22 04:03:19

Donald Trump


Inside Bay Area - The magazine, which came out Thursday, also includes George Clooney’s $7-million Italian villa, Donald Trump’s $10-million Palm Beach estate, Rosie O’Donnell’s $6-million Biscayne Bay, Fla., mansion, Elton John’s $9.75-million property in the south of

Russell Simmons Speaks Out Against Mike Vick; Nike Suspended Shoe
allhiphop.com - If Bill gates did something crazy like dog fighting and got caught up Donald Trump ain’t going get in the media and bash Bill Gates. Futhermore people hunt deer and animals everyday as a sport. Im not saying dog fighting is right, but what I am

SAVE OUR W. SIDE CHOPPERS!
New York Post - July 20, 2007 — TITANS of industry are rushing to the defense of the West 30th Street Heliport now that greenie, granola-eating preservationists are looking to shut down the family-owned facility. Donald Trump , NBC Chairman/CEO Bob Wright and

Private Property Stands In Way Of Running Horse Golf Course
KFSN - 07/19/2007 - Donald Trump’s put up $1 million to buy Running Horse, and more money is on the way. But even after a judge makes him the new owner he still has some key hurdles to clear. Representatives from the Trump organization will be in Fresno

Q-C Times Blog
Quad-Cities Times - That NBC is back in bed with Donald Trump for a celebrity edition of The Apprentice. For a dream casting coup, how about Rosie O Donnell? Donald personally told me to extend an invite to her, Silverman said. That Isaiah Washington

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-22 04:03:19
2007-07-21 04:03:19

Donald Trump


Serbianna - George Bulgarian Orthodox Church, which was meeting in an East Toledo home, according to Evanka Dimitroff, 78. “He was a good person — caring and interesting. You could talk to him,” Mrs. Dimitroff said. She said the archbishop helped with the

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-21 04:03:19
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