2007-07-19 04:03:19

Donald Trump


Gloucester Daily Times - Donald Trump was on the phone. It was the third time he’d called in the last two hours so I took the call. “What’s up, Donald?” I asked, chasing right to the cut. “That’s The Donald to you,” he guffawed, his famous hair not moving a wisp while his

Business news in brief
Philadelphia Inquirer - Donald Trump’s daughter, Ivanka Trump, will join the board of his casino company, Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc. “She’s been outstanding in everything she has done, and she will be an outstanding board member,” Trump said during the weekend. Ivanka

Backing urged for Trump golf plans
Herald - Businesses which support Donald Trump’s 1bn plan to build “the world’s best golf complex” on the outskirts of Aberdeen are being urged to put their views in writing. Aberdeen and Grampian Chamber of Commerce has written to its 1200 members urging

NBC Rehires The Donald
Palm Beach Interactive - He’s hired again. Yes, NBC is bringing back The Apprentice , Donald Trump’s ratings-challenged reality show for another season after canceling it in May because, well, it was ratings-challenged. But there’s gonna be a twist. Isn’t there always a

Will Rosie Be Trump’s ‘Apprentice’?
ClickOnDetroit.com - Donald Trump asked NBC executives to invite Rosie O’Donnell to be on the next version of “The Apprentice.” The news came Monday morning as NBC announced plans to invite celebrities to take part in the Trump leadership test. But it didn’t take long

TheStar.com - GTA - Trump lops 13 floors from luxury T.O. condo
Toronto Star - Donald Trump’s Toronto tower is taking just a little off the top. The Trump International Hotel and Tower which was to be a 70-storey, five-star, $500-million project at the corner of Bay and Adelaide Sts. will now be 57 storeys. Gone are 11

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-19 04:03:19
2007-07-18 04:03:25

Donald Trump


TMZ.com - What a difference a TV show makes — Rosie O’Donnell’s two biggest nemeses of the last year, Donald Trump and Star Jones, are prepared to make nice with the acid-tongued talk titan, as long as she comes on their respective shows. Trump said yesterday

NBC Rehires The Donald
Palm Beach Interactive - He’s hired again. Yes, NBC is bringing back The Apprentice , Donald Trump’s ratings-challenged reality show for another season after canceling it in May because, well, it was ratings-challenged. But there’s gonna be a twist. Isn’t there always a

Trump Wants Rosie as ‘Apprentice’
NewsMax.com - The new executives running NBC said on Monday they would bring Donald Trump’s reality show “The Apprentice” back from near extinction for at least one more run — this time with celebrities playing for charity. And in yet another twist to efforts to

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-18 04:03:25
2007-07-18 00:00:00

Heart-healthy foods keep your ticker in top shape

The following article is from CNN health. I found it to be a very concise and straight forward.

Creating custom food plans for patients isn’t the hard part of Bethany Thayer’s job. For the Michigan-based registered dietitian and spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, one of the most difficult aspects of her work is helping patients interpret the often-contradictory health news they hear each day.

“Patients often ask me, ‘Why does nutrition advice flip-flop all the time?’ ” Thayer says. They may have a point. Take the recent dustup over fat recommendations, for example. In 2005, the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommended limiting the amount of fat you consume each day to 20 to 35 percent of total calories. But in a year later, the front page of The New York Times declared: “Low-Fat Diet Does Not Cut Health Risks.” No wonder Thayer’s patients — and many others — are confused. What should the average person make of these mixed messages?

Thayer’s answer: Take the long view. “One study isn’t going to determine what we should be eating,” she says. “Nutrition is a complex science — what appears to some as flip-flopping is actually defining and refining some of the recommendations we make.”

The food factor

Nowhere is the evolving nature of nutrition science clearer than in the fight against heart disease, the No. 1 cause of death among Americans. Some foods that were once considered to increase the risk of disease, like fats and alcohol, now don’t seem so bad — in fact, limited amounts may play an active role in helping ward off heart disease. As nutrition knowledge has grown, so has scientific understanding of heart disease, a maze of cholesterol levels, blood pressure, arterial inflammation, and lifestyle factors, such as diet, stress, and fitness levels.

This is why prevention requires a multipronged approach — but what you eat is certainly key. “Just eating certain foods isn’t going to completely prevent heart disease, but they can take the fight to the next level,” says Mikelle McCoin, R.D., M.P.H., senior nutrition educator at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease in San Francisco, California. To identify those foods, we spoke to Thayer, McCoin, and three other leading nutrition researchers. The result is a guide to the nutritional architecture that supports a heart-healthy diet. CookingLight.com: Take our heart-smart quiz

Heart helper: soluble fiber

Soluble fiber acts like a scouring pad for your circulatory system, clearing out harmful low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol before it has a chance to stick to artery walls, where it forms thick, hard deposits that block blood flow. “Soluble fiber is potent in lowering ldl,” says Wahida Karmally, Dr.P.H., M.S., R.D., director of nutrition at the Irving Center for Clinical Research at Columbia University Medical Center. According to a study Karmally co-wrote in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, people who add just 3 grams of soluble fiber to their diets each day (the research team used three-fourths of a cup of whole-grain oat cereal, three times daily) can lower their LDL levels by 5 percent in six weeks. While that might sound small, consider this: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has found that each 1 percent reduction in a person’s LDL cholesterol levels can be expected to reduce his or her overall heart disease risk by 2 percent. The other form of fiber, insoluble, also has a scouring effect, but in a different way; it helps move food through your digestive system.

Find it in: Whole grains, such as oatmeal, bran, and barley, as well as fruits, vegetables, and legumes are great sources. Some of these foods also contain other compounds, such as phytochemicals, vitamins, and trace minerals, that may help fight heart disease — another reason fruits, vegetables, and whole grains frequently top nutritionists’ lists of recommended foods. CookingLight.com: Whole grain pastas

How much you need: Aim for 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

Heart helpers: unsaturated fats

Although conventional wisdom once held that the heart-healthiest diets were practically fat-free, that notion has changed in recent years. “You want a diet that’s moderate in fat,” says Alice H. Lichtenstein, D.Sc., chairperson of the American Heart Association’s nutrition committee and director of the Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory at Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts. The best way to achieve it: Restrict the two types of fat that don’t benefit your heart — saturated and trans-fatty acids — and substitute two “good” fats, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated.

Monounsaturated fats help raise levels of helpful high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. These HDL molecules act like bodyguards, capturing “bad” LDL molecules in the arteries and escorting them to your liver, where they are filtered out of the body. According to the results of a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association, people who increased their intake of monounsaturated fats in place of saturated fats and high-sugar carbohydrates over three years reduced their risk of heart disease by 20 percent.

Find them in: Vegetable oils, nuts, olives, avocados, and fish are all good sources of mono- and polyunsaturated fats. Just remember that any source of fat — whether it’s olive oil or butter — is calorie dense. “One gram of fat contains nine calories, compared to only four calories for carbohydrates and protein,” Thayer says.That’s why substitution is crucial; you want to add healthful fats to your diet while subtracting not-so-healthful ones to keep daily calorie intake on an even keel.CookingLight.com: Eight surprisingly nutritious foods and how to eat more of them

How much you need: The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest that 20 to 35 percent of your total daily calories should come from fat. Of that amount, no more than 10 percent should come from saturated fat. For someone on a 2,000-calorie per day diet, that translates to 65 grams of unsaturated fats.

Heart helpers: omega 3 fatty acids

Polyunsaturated fats are helpful in their own right, but a subset of polys, called omega 3 fatty acids, are amazing multi-taskers, simultaneously combating several heart disease risk factors. Omega 3s permeate the cells that line your circulatory system. They make your arteries more supple, which helps reduce blood pressure and prevent arterial inflammation. They also help regulate the electrical impulses that keep your heart beating steadily, preventing arrhythmia. But omega 3s’ neatest trick is changing the quality of LDL cholesterol molecules. “Omega 3s help reduce the rate of plaque buildup by making LDL cholesterol lighter and fluffier, so blood vessels can’t take it up as easily,” says Marguerite M. Engler, Ph.D., a cardiovascular researcher and professor at the University of California in San Francisco.

Find them in: Fatty cold-water fish such as salmon, pollock, swordfish, tuna, mackerel, and herring are the best sources of omega 3 fatty acids. Fish contain the two types of omega 3s that the body uses most efficiently: docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Foods such as soybeans, walnuts, and flaxseed also contain omega 3 fatty acids; however, the type — called alpha-linoleic acid (ALA) — is not as readily available to the body as DHA or EPA. “You’re not going to get high levels of DHA and EPA by eating walnuts or flaxseed because your body can’t metabolize the plant fat as efficiently,” Engler says. CookingLight.com: Food combinations that lower your cholesterol

How much you need: As yet, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved Reference Daily Intake for omega 3s. However, the FDA and the American Heart Association recommend eating fresh fish at least twice a week. A six-ounce serving of salmon, herring, or tuna provides a gram or more of omega 3s.

Heart Helper: Alcohol

Ifyou enjoy an occasional drink with dinner, you can take comfort in knowing that consuming alcohol in moderation may be good for your heart. First, alcohol makes the blood somewhat less likely to clot. Second, alcohol consumption helps elevate Hal cholesterol levels and reduce C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of arterial inflammation and heart-disease risk. Adults who consume one or two drinks each day can reduce their overall risk of developing heart disease by 30 to 50 percent, according to the American Heart Association. (One serving of alcohol equals 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1?? ounces of 80-proof spirits.)

You don’t have to start drinking to improve your heart health, however. Plenty of other lifestyle changes can improve your health in a similar manner to alcohol, such as regular exercise and a healthful diet.

Find it in: While red wine has made headlines for the antioxidants it contains, any type of alcohol delivers the same benefits to your heart. The way to obtain them: moderation. How much you need: For women, one serving is best. Men can drink two because enzymes in their stomachs are more effective at metabolizing alcohol. Beyond those amounts, alcohol can cause more harm than help. A study of more than 2,500 people published in Circulation found CRP levels in people who consumed more than the recommended amount of alcohol were higher than in those who drank itin moderation.

Soy story, revised

Don’t Miss
  • MayoClinic.com: Health Library
  • Healthology: Health Video Library
Filed under: — @ 2007-07-18 00:00:00
2007-07-16 00:00:00

Guest Article: Safeguarding critical patient information

I’ve been researching service continuity for patients in Healthcare organizations recently. I ran across a company, Marathon Technologies, who focuses on fault tolerance in IT infrastructures and I found it interesting that they were targeting tools necessary to provide care for patients. I invited Mr. Joost Verhofstad, Director of Healthcare Solutions at Marathon, to talk a bit about what they do and how they safeguard critical patient information. I requested that he help prescribe preventative high availability solutions to ensure that unplanned system failures never come between patients and their healthcare needs.

What is the single most reason given by Healthcare IT Administrators for improving IT infrastructure? Without question, Patient Care tops every list, followed closely by federal regulations and costs. With the rise in government mandated regulations such as HIPAA, identifying ways to encourage widespread use of electronic data interchange has resulted in a surge of activity within healthcare organizations from hospitals to pharmaceutical organizations looking for ways to streamline processes that improve patient care and reduce risk. In today???s world, it is imperative that no patient ever has to wait to receive care; especially not as a result of paperwork or technology issues.

As Healthcare organizations adopt new technology to improve their efficiency, their dependence on that technology increases exponentially. Today, third party vendors handle physician paging and delivery of alert codes. Government Agencies provide call center and online assistance to potential patients in need of care. Pharmaceutical companies track critical drugs. All of these tasks are handled by an intricately designed IT Infrastructure. However, what happens to all of these critical applications if a failure were to occur? What about the integrity of the caregiver???s data in the event of a disaster?

If the IT Team implemented a high availability solution, then downtime (planned or unplanned) won???t be an issue for the patients who depend on these services. In the event of a disaster, critical patient information, including insurance information, can be accessed from alternative locations. A well planned ???high availability??? approach can protect critical applications and data from unplanned events ensuring service continuity to patient.

When considering an upgrade to a current healthcare IT infrastructure, many organizations will utilize complicated and complex systems like clusters which require increased staff and enormous cost while increasing failure points. In contrast, there are software solutions currently on the market that provide the highest reliability for Healthcare IT systems and maintain availability with limited administration and installation costs.

With so many different approaches to achieving ???availability,??? understanding not only what is best for your hospital or organization, but the solutions your partners and vendors utilize will ensure that every patient receives exceptional care when they need it. Integrating ???high availability??? should be at the top of organization???s list of requirements for ???Improving Patient Care???.

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-16 00:00:00
2007-07-16 00:00:00

Guest Article: Safeguarding critical patient information

I’ve been researching service continuity for patients in Healthcare organizations recently. I ran across a company, Marathon Technologies, who focuses on fault tolerance in IT infrastructures and I found it interesting that they were targeting tools necessary to provide care for patients. I invited Mr. Joost Verhofstad, Director of Healthcare Solutions at Marathon, to talk a bit about what they do and how they safeguard critical patient information. I requested that he help prescribe preventative high availability solutions to ensure that unplanned system failures never come between patients and their healthcare needs.

What is the single most reason given by Healthcare IT Administrators for improving IT infrastructure? Without question, Patient Care tops every list, followed closely by federal regulations and costs. With the rise in government mandated regulations such as HIPAA, identifying ways to encourage widespread use of electronic data interchange has resulted in a surge of activity within healthcare organizations from hospitals to pharmaceutical organizations looking for ways to streamline processes that improve patient care and reduce risk. In today???s world, it is imperative that no patient ever has to wait to receive care; especially not as a result of paperwork or technology issues.

As Healthcare organizations adopt new technology to improve their efficiency, their dependence on that technology increases exponentially. Today, third party vendors handle physician paging and delivery of alert codes. Government Agencies provide call center and online assistance to potential patients in need of care. Pharmaceutical companies track critical drugs. All of these tasks are handled by an intricately designed IT Infrastructure. However, what happens to all of these critical applications if a failure were to occur? What about the integrity of the caregiver???s data in the event of a disaster?

If the IT Team implemented a high availability solution, then downtime (planned or unplanned) won???t be an issue for the patients who depend on these services. In the event of a disaster, critical patient information, including insurance information, can be accessed from alternative locations. A well planned ???high availability??? approach can protect critical applications and data from unplanned events ensuring service continuity to patient.

When considering an upgrade to a current healthcare IT infrastructure, many organizations will utilize complicated and complex systems like clusters which require increased staff and enormous cost while increasing failure points. In contrast, there are software solutions currently on the market that provide the highest reliability for Healthcare IT systems and maintain availability with limited administration and installation costs.

With so many different approaches to achieving ???availability,??? understanding not only what is best for your hospital or organization, but the solutions your partners and vendors utilize will ensure that every patient receives exceptional care when they need it. Integrating ???high availability??? should be at the top of organization???s list of requirements for ???Improving Patient Care???.

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-16 00:00:00
2007-07-13 04:03:19

Donald Trump


MSN UK News - In recent years, Moscow has played Shtokman as a trump card in its dealings with the West, scrapping and reviving talks and — depending on the political climate — varying proposed export routes to favour either Europe or North America. Since last

DealTalk: Private equity on a roll with gaming buyouts
MSN MoneyCentral - Casino operator Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc. sent its shares plummeting this month by announcing it could not reach a deal with potential buyers. But Stewart sees a variety of roles for private equity within gaming. Expansion in hot spots

Rich Dad Education(TM) Successes Fuel Expansion into Canada
Forbes - Trump. “The addition of targeted strategies designed to teach people how to live by and benefit from the Rich Dad thinking has given us the vehicle to provide even greater benefit to our students. With our U.S. program established, it’s time to use

Rio Tinto near deal to buy Alcan for $37 bln: report
Reuters - The reported price would represent a premium of nearly 12 percent above Alcan’s closing price in New York on Wednesday, and trump a $28.8 billion offer from Alcoa Inc. “Boards of both Alcan and Rio have approved the transaction,” the Wall Street

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-13 04:03:19
2007-07-11 00:00:00

Research questioning EMRs effectiveness mounts

A buddy of mine, Bob Burns at 5th Quadrant, sent me a couple of links questioning the clinical effectiveness of EMRs; the links were just adding to several others reports that I’ve seen recently. I’m not sure I agree with all the findings, but the direction in which the winds are blowing is clear: be wary of EMRs that promise better clinical outcomes.

  • Electronic Health Record Use and the Quality of Ambulatory Care in the United States (from the Archives of Internal Medicine).
  • Electronic Records Fail To Enhance Care, Study Finds (from iHealthBeat).
Filed under: — @ 2007-07-11 00:00:00
2007-07-11 00:00:00

Research questioning EMRs effectiveness mounts

A buddy of mine, Bob Burns at 5th Quadrant, sent me a couple of links questioning the clinical effectiveness of EMRs; the links were just adding to several others reports that I’ve seen recently. I’m not sure I agree with all the findings, but the direction in which the winds are blowing is clear: be wary of EMRs that promise better clinical outcomes.

  • Electronic Health Record Use and the Quality of Ambulatory Care in the United States (from the Archives of Internal Medicine).
  • Electronic Records Fail To Enhance Care, Study Finds (from iHealthBeat).
Filed under: — @ 2007-07-11 00:00:00
2007-07-10 04:03:18

Donald Trump


NorthJersey.com - Trump Plaza loses its appeal of dealers’ vote to join UAW Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino has lost its appeal to overturn the results of a spring election in which more than two-thirds of dealers voted to join the United Auto Workers union.

Bally’s Atlantic City Dealers OK Union
Caspar Star-Tribune - Before that, in March, dealers at Caesars Atlantic City and Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino voted to join the UAW. The union already represents dealers at three Detroit gambling halls: MGM Grand Detroit Casino, MotorCity Casino and Greektown Casino. “We

Featured PRFirm
PRWeb - The Society of Recovering Sorority Girls Commend Donald Trump in Recognizing the Value of Sorority and Fraternity 2005, the Las Vegas headquarters for America s Party, a New Year s Eve Celebration, will take place on the Plaza at

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-10 04:03:18
2007-07-09 04:03:21

Donald Trump


ABC News - And just last year, Donald Trump granted Miss USA Tara Conner a reprieve after rumors of drug and alcohol abuse. “In no way did I think that it would be possible for a second chance to be given to me,” Conner said at the time. She kept her crown, but

Casino’s general manager ready to roll
South Bend Tribune - J., starting as a craps dealer in 1979, and he eventually worked his way up to the position of general manager at Trump Plaza. In all, he worked 15 years for Donald Trump’s Atlantic City properties, including stints at Trump’s Taj Mahal, in which he

NBC eyeing more of ‘Apprentice’
Hollywood Reporter - “The Apprentice” could be one step closer to getting a renewal at NBC. Sources said Friday that talks are heating up among the network, executive producer Mark Burnett and exec producer/star Donald Trump to continue the reality competition show. As

Filed under: — @ 2007-07-09 04:03:21
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